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20 Tips to Support a Reluctant Reader

Does your child seem uninterested in reading even though they can read?  In this article, Patsy Lyons from Tara Book Company has 20 tips for parents to support your child, the “reluctant reader”

What is a reluctant reader?

This term is used to describe a child who can read but has little interest in reading regularly.

Some children see reading as hard work and will only read when and what they have to. We, as parents, want our children to experience the joy of reading and ensure that they have the best advantages in their education.

Reading is a skill that needs to be practised.

Children who read a lot have better comprehension, extensive vocabulary and vivid imaginations. They are better equipped to handle the volumes of reading they have to do in secondary school.

So what can we do ?

#1. Lead by example.  Let your child see you reading and enjoying the experience.

#2. Know what interests them.  Sport?Dogs? Humour? Adventure?  Get books on these subjects.

#3. Let them choose their own books.  But steer them in the right direction.

#4. Try books with short stories.  Sometimes short stories on subjects they might find interesting such as Spies, Ghosts, War, Humour etc are easier to start with.

#5. Leave joke books lying around.  Anything that gets them reading!

Related article: Supporting your child with reading

#6. Boys particularly love non-fiction. Choose books with good quality photographs.

#7. Try Non Fiction books with text broken up into small pockets.  They can get through a lot of reading without realising it.

#8. Choose Graphic books.  These appear easy but in fact require a high level of skill to link the text and pictures.

#9. Encourage a change from series books. Children can get hooked into a series and will read nothing else, so encourage and gently nudge them on to similar books, not part of a series.

#10. Comics.  These might motivate your child enough to get them started.

#11. Read to your child.  Start with only one chapter each night, if they are “hooked” on the story they will want to read on when you’ve finished.

#12. Build stamina.  Keep moving your child on to more challenging books.

13. Talk about the books they’ve read or their favourite author.  Encourage their interest by talking about the stories they liked or what they think of the author.

#14. Market books. Use ploys, try telling them a particular book is unsuitable, they’ll knock you over to get their hands on it.

#15. Buy books with larger print. Larger print books and illustrations are not as daunting.

#16. Movie books. If you know a particular movie is coming out try to read the book in advance

#17. Choose well written books by established authors. A good starting point is award winners.

#18. Pick simpler books that they can manage easily. They get great satisfaction from finishing a book.

#19. Do not put pressure on them.  You wouldn’t like someone constantly asking you what you’re reading or how you’re getting on with a particular book.

#20. Praise them.  When they have earned it, when they have completed a book, be sure to praise them.

Tara Book Co., Kilcolgan, Co. Galway, Ireland.  Visit them online at www.tarabookco.ie or tel: (091) 777005

Is your child a reluctant reader?  Do you have any tips to share?  Share them in comments below

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This website was created by Jill Holtz and Michelle Davitt, both of whom are mothers of young children. Jill and Michelle decided to create this resource themselves, and launched mykidstime.ie in 2007.

Comments

  1. Dyslexia is a lot more common that people may think and is a major reason why some children find reading to be hard work and not enjoyable. http://www.DyslexiaGames.com has a lot of information on the topic, help for parents and teachers, and a program that kids really enjoy that also really works.